Weldon Myrick

Weldon Myrick was a great pedal steel guitarist. He came to Nashville from Texas, first to play on a recording session for a girl named Hope Griffith (in a band that also included a young Waylon Jennings).

Nobody talks about Weldon without talking about his steel part on Connie Smith’s “Once a Day.” Yeah, that’s cool. But listen for him on fantastic recordings by Charley Pride, Rusty Kershaw, Eric Andersen, Sammi Smith, Alan Jackson, Steve Young, Kris Kristofferson, Leon Russell, Ferlin Husky, Gary fucking Stewart, Tom T. Hall, Larry Jon Wilson and maybe a hundred other amazing artist.

Also listen for Weldon’s name to get dropped in these episodes of the podcast.

CR013 Rusty & Doug Kershaw: Swamp Things

CR013 Rusty & Doug Kershaw: The Cajun Way

1200 630 Cocaine & Rhinestones

Doug Kershaw is the most famous Cajun musician in history. His brother, Rusty, is not, though you may be more familiar with his work than you realize. 

These brothers come from a long tradition of surviving against the odds, against a world that would just as soon see you dead as see you succeed. Starting from nothing but a houseboat in Louisiana, they fought their way through an unscrupulous industry, through honky tonk stages screened off with chicken wire, onto the biggest stages in the business, in order to create some of the greatest music ever made. Then, they battled themselves, their past and their addictions.

Side note: what the hell is “Cajun”? Swamp stuff, right? Well, let’s talk about all of that.

This episode is recommend for fans of: Hardcore History, Neil Young, Johnny Cash, Bob Dylan and discovering unbelievably good music that you’ve never heard.

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Jeannie C. Riley

CR008 Harper Valley PTA, Part 2: Jeannie C. Riley

1200 630 Cocaine & Rhinestones

Jeannie C. Riley’s debut single sold over a million copies within ten days of being released but she never wanted to record the song. She’s often considered a one-hit wonder. We can easily disprove that.

In the late ’60s, Jeannie C. Riley became country music’s most blatant sex symbol to date but she never wanted to wear those clothes. Small town girl with big dreams goes to the city and lets it break her in order to make her. Total cliche, right?

Sure.

Except Jeannie’s choice to bury the story in lie after lie turns it into a mystery tale of obscured identity, infidelity and blackmail. In this episode, some truth sees the light of day, maybe for the first time ever.

Recommended for fans of Johnny Paycheck, Johnny Russell, The Wilburn Brothers, Tom T. Hall, Little Darlin’ Records and mystery novels.

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